Female: Part Three

I originally planned to make this post centered around sexual assault. I have the post drafted, and maybe it will find it’s way into the world someday, but I decided none of my commentaries were revolutionary to the issue. It’s a problem too big and complicated to be tackled by the neighborhood blogger. It doesn’t mean I am not a prevention activist, it just means I’m still deciding how to contribute and speak to the solution.

Instead, I want to focus on a positive of the female experience. The major influences in my life. My go-to girls. The women that have shaped me.

I’ve been gifted in my life to be surrounded by truly astounding women. I want to focus in on the dynamics of a few different relationships that have developed throughout my life. The mother. The bestie. And the mentor.

For me, all those roles are filled by women. And while not everyone shares the same experience, like some people look for male role models for guidance where I look to a past camp counselor turned sorority sister, these relationships have helped to develop the fundamentals of my character. And there’s no other way to celebrate all they’ve given me than with the final installment of Female.

The Mother.

I once told my mom she was my best friend. She replied that was sad and I should look for some friends my age. From the very beginning, my mother has filled the support role, but she’s also filled the “please be realistic” role. Even as she cheered on the horribly composed songs of my pigtail days, she reminded me that not every celebrity story is as glamorous as Taylor Swift’s. She keeps me on target and ready to go.
She’s a hardworking woman that never stops bettering herself to better her team. That’s a trait I hope to develop as I join the real world at her side. She is my working woman role model day after day after day. Through our relationship, I’ve learned how to communicate effectively with others, finding words that add to a conversation and fix problems. And I’ve come to realize, this is not a skill all people have. She’s taught me to trade petty for potential and repair mistakes rather than defend them in anger. I’ve learned humility and hope and patience and priorities. Every time someone says I remind them of her, I feel like I’m getting closer and closer to my goals. To my Mother, thank you for all you contribute to my womanhood.

The Bestie. 

In my case, I have quite a few. My friendships have grown in numbers since my “I only have seven friends, and one of them is my cousin” days. For those who aren’t familiar, that was an insult written to me anonymously on social media. Little did the attacker know it was all too true to be mean. With each woman that joins my life, I learn a new thing. I think my immediate high school friend group taught me that girls grow stronger together. They’ve shown me what true investment in a relationship is. My college friends have listening ears like no other and have shown me that I can’t fix my friends, I can only support them as they work to fix themselves. And my sorority sisters continue to impress me with their abilities to inspire uniqueness while also creating unity.
All these relationships thrive off the fundamental pillars of effort and loyalty. I think there is something so special about the relationships that form between female friends. Obviously, those crying-over-Halo-Top-“I can’t live without you” bonds are life-changing, but I’m even talking about the surface connections we make every day.  I really believe that effort in a relationship is only due where it is reciprocated, and I’m proud to say there are few situations in my life where I have to act on that belief. To my besties, thank you for all you contribute to my womanhood.

The Mentor. 

I’ve been lucky to have quite a few badass ladies inspire me in my life. The influence of some lasting longer than others. But what I’ve come to learn from all these relationships, is that no matter how different their life paths, each of these women pose as guidance in a different way. I’ve always struggled with the idea of asking someone to be my mentor, but as I reflect on these people’s roles in my life, I see that they’ve always been fulfilling that purpose, whether they know it or not. And I am beginning to see the relationships as more symbiotic, because I can contribute to their support network, too.
Aside from professional development, my mentors are responsible for some of my biggest emotional developments, too. There is so much I owe to these open lines of communication, I’m honestly struggling to put it all into words. In the end, I think the biggest thing they’ve created in me in my independence. My comfort with being alone and how to proudly build confidence in it. Of course, I have down days, but turning to these women minimizes the effects and reminds me that happiness with myself is a gift I’m lucky to have.
When I dissect moments I share with my mentors, I hope to one day fill these shoes for someone else. Help another girl find herself in the mess of unfair expectations and the unnecessary isolation of growing up. I work to be that for my sister by sharing my experiences so she knows she can share with me, too. To my mentors, thank you for all you contribute to my womanhood.

These relationships will not apply to the entirety of the female population, this post was meant to inspire you to be grateful for the female relationships that are present in your life. I’ve been blessed with so many, too many, not enough. And my collection keeps growing with every step I take and every hand I shake. Look around you and appreciate it! Whether it’s just a mother, just a friend, just a mentor, or all of the above and more.

Being a woman can be hard sometimes, but it’s never impossible. Now, not a day goes by that I’m not thankful for this experience. I know that I face every day with an army of millions that will stand in stilettos just to support me.

I think this mini-series has served its purpose: to inspire me to be more mindful of my female experience. No profound call to action, no wish for a better tomorrow. Just me, loving what I got.  Can I get a “girl power?”


Stuck in my head: Goodmorning // Bleachers
Snap it: Union Market (crying because the wall is already gone)

 

Female: Part Two.

Coming to you live, from her Clueless clad dorm room, it’s Jordan. And believe it or not, I just finished a book. I can practically hear my high school friends gasping from across the country.

My track record with reading is subpar. It took me half a year to read Mindy Kahling’s 300-paged memoir, 3 extra weeks to finish To Kill A Mockingbird for school. It’s not that I’m not literate, it’s just that I wasn’t prioritizing literacy. This semester, I wanted a solution to both my writer’s block and technology-induced insomnia. 

The book I read is called Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud. It’s written by Anne Helen Peterson, a culture writer at Buzzfeed. I initially ordered it because, hello, Buzzfeed, but what I came to find was that it was really relatable to how I’ve been feeling lately. The book dissects the labels of prominent female celebrities. Among the chapters, you’ll find Kim Kardashian, Nikki Minaj, Hillary Clinton. It questions why women are often labeled as too much of something when they don’t fit the proper mold of a woman in the public eye. 

I think I’m graciously independent as a person. I love reassurance, but decisions are ultimately my own and I act for myself first, keeping the people I love as a close second. I jokingly always tell my friends to “be bold,” because “boys like bold girls.” But, what I’ve come to find is that girls like strong girls and society likes polite ones. One of my newfound, and most hated, fears is being penalized for something that’s a part of who I am. She’s too forward because she texts first, too provocative because her boots graze the upper thigh, too bossy because she makes her ideas known. I’d like to say fear of reputation damage doesn’t hold me back, but it does. 

In reflecting on the book, I think that my personal hesitation to leap with open arms comes from the worry of not being respected as a woman, a student, a creative. Sometimes it’s easier to stay silent than ask questions and show vulnerability. And I know I’m feeding the fire, but it’s scary to be a social innovator and it’s a role I’m not sure I’m prepared to take on… yet.

In Lena Dunham’s chapter, Too Naked, it’s said:

“Dunham’s nudity isn’t “brave,” because… for it to be brave she would have to be afraid.”

And I feel like, in a non-nudity related way, that describes how I want to grow as a female. I don’t want to have to feel courageous when I raise my hand in class or when I reply to a Snapchat “too soon.” And to get there, I have to practice not being afraid. Shutting down the second-guessing and layers of analysis. More of an want, act, reflect, repeat model. 

I used to tell myself to do one thing every day that scares me. Whether it’s writing this blog post (about a topic I’ve been scared to talk about because what do I know) or trying a new food for the first time, it was a step towards less unknown. My goal is to bring that back. And to encourage my friends to do the same. One less fear, one more reason to girl boss.

So yeah, I am too opinionated, too power hungry, too obsessive. But that’s also me being vocal, ambitious, and inspired. Three traits a young woman exploring the world should have. We should stop letting our “too”s be paired with negatives and let the females fill the narrative. Because “too unruly” is really just code for not taking this shit anymore. 

And that’s basically where I’m at.


Stuck in my head: Something To Tell You // HAIM
Snap it: my bed!!

Find Anne’s other works here. And join Girls’ Night In Club for more feminist book suggestions like Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud.

My next read is Lily Collin’s memoir, Unfiltered, on her eating disorder and other things young women struggle with. Look at me so knowledge hungry and feminist, right?

If you missed earlier installations of Female, here is the Introduction and Part One

Female: Part One.

Tuesday honestly sucked. It was one of those days where seconds pass like hours and you have to eat Halo Top at 3pm to keep from a mental breakdown. We all have low points and sad moments. And they never not suck.

It can be hard to pull yourself out of a funk like that, but luckily I attended Pineapple DC x Salt and Sundry‘s event with Cherry Bombe about women in the DC food scene. The second I walked in I was surrounded by strong, enthusiastic women and their accomplishments. From girl power vendors like Gordy’s to t-shirts that read “Doughs before bros” (doughnuts, duh), it was so uplifting to actually see the success I strive for every day.

The panel featured four women: Suzanne Simon, founder of Chaia, Krystal Mack, owner of the 3 Wheels Food Group in Baltimore, Amanda McClements, creator of Salt and Sundry and Little Leaf, and Ann Yang, co-founder of Misfit Juicery (who I’m meeting with early next month to talk entrepreneurship, marketing strategy, and post-college!!!). The entire event was moderated by Kerry Diamond, editor in chief of Cherry Bombe Magazine.

They discussed three main topics: risk, roadblocks, and the void. Risk focused on entering the industry both financially and socially. There’s room for a lot of failure in starting a business. Roadblocks were difficulties faced due to being a woman. You can imagine the list was endless, but what was most prominent was being considered “cute” rather than serious. And finally, the void that each woman saw and filled with their idea. For Misfit Juicery, it has to do with reducing food waste. Chaia, a purely vegetarian concept. They also discussed voids that still exist and need to be acted on. By women. Now.

When it was over, there was a Q & A session. You know me. Of course, I stuck my hand in the air and asked a question. 

“What advice do you have for a young professional entering the food world, trying to figure out what she wants to pursue and experience?”

Their answers were super helpful. From sending handwritten notes in networking to aiming to work alongside my idols rather than fangirl over them, I learned a lot in the moments that followed my question. But, the bigger impact came after the session concluded.

Women started stopping me on my way out. Complimenting my eagerness to learn and offering their assistance. Handshakes were replaced with hugs and business cards were passed around with smiles. It was the perfect combination of #girlbossing and supporting. Everyone was there for a reason (food, networking, learning) but there was still time to build community on the side.

I think that ability to connect is something that comes more naturally to women. While we’re often stereotyped as jealous and eager to prove ourselves, I felt nothing but pure power in that room. There was a hunger to ignite change, sure, but also a passion to celebrate the accomplishments of ladies taking over DC food one forkful at a time. It was united and invaluably inspiring. Both as a woman and as someone that appreciates a good meal.

So, to finish Part One, I want to thank the defiant, empowering women that are making it easier for me to achieve my goals. It was a night I will never forget.

And that, plus the bread pudding I ate, turned my day around real fast. 


Stuck in my head: The Love Club // Lorde
Snap it: Pineapple DC x Salt and Sundry presents Cherry Bombe

In case you missed it, don’t forget to read Female: Introduction.

Female: Introduction. 

I’d never given much thought to my gender until recently. You are a woman. That’s it. I know that comes from a place of privilege; I’m white, educated, young, and heterosexual. But due to current events and exposure, I’ve started to open my eyes to the way the world perceives strong women these days. They’re often labeled as too much of something. Too domineering. Too opinionated. Too involved. More to come on this later. 

So I’ve decided to write a three-part blog series entitled Female. Each post will dissect an experience that made me reflect on what it means to be a girl. Part one will come tomorrow. Then look for a new post next week and the week after. Then we can return to tales of toast and Insta.

And I in no way intend to isolate my male readers (Hi Dad). I think it’s important to gain perspective on how your daughter, your wife, your friend could potentially be facing the world, too. So while the words come from me, the experience is shared. 

So put on your brightest shade of pink and keep an open mind. These posts come from the heart, the mind, and the tits. 


Stuck in my head: Talk Too Much // COIN
Snap it: Union Market, DC

Exciting News.

Call me Carrie Bradshaw because I’m officially published. So excited to share my article for Marriott International’s blog, Marriott Traveler, featuring my two favorite things: Iceland and Instagram.

So grab a latte and get ready to plan your next vacation. It’ll be one your camera roll will never forget. 

Check it out by clicking here, here, or here


Stuck in my head: Mr. Know-It-All // Young the Giant
Snap it: Rangárbing Eystra… aka Iceland

Things I Learned In My Cubicle.

Honestly, I never pictured myself sitting front row to a desktop computer in a sea of beige, but after this summer, I can proudly say it’s not as bad as the movies make it out to be. I spend an absurd amount of time imagining myself sitting city side, latte in hand, working to create the next big thing in an office that gets bagels regularly delivered. So, when I was handed a non-Mac and a desk chair I was definitely brought back to reality.

My summer internship has been insane. Aside from a team of the smartest people I’ve ever met, I’ve grown from Googling what SEO (Search Engine Optimization*) stands for to an amateur, asks a million questions to make sure she’s doing it right, crawler.

Here are some other things I’ve learned along the road to 40 hours a week x 10 weeks.

1. Business Casual(ly missing wearing chokers everyday)

A huge adjustment was swapping body suits for blazers and getting into the professional mindset stylistically. But no worries guys, I found ways to incorporate my favorites into corporate life. Enter silver platform sandals, big hoop earrings, and plenty of denim on denim. What once required a separate shopping trip to “Mom Stores,” is now about creativity, subtleness, and compromise. Not going to lie though, I’m happy to be back in the land of the fashionably free.

2. The Question Game.

A huge skill I’ve cultivated this summer is called “The Informational Interview.” It’s when you sit down, one on one, and play Vogue 73 Questions. People love to talk about themselves and being young, eager, and work force un-ready, it’s been really helpful to hear their stories and tips. It’s mostly about tuning in and asking the right questions to get the most out of every discussion. For me, I always try to lead back to creativity, career growth, and the culture of a company.

3. Making the First Move.

Being the youngest intern of 63 was a little daunting. Even though there were plenty of rising juniors, it was scary to know that I’m the only one walking into work with that “I just experienced college for the first time” vibe. But over time, and through a cross-department intern project, I came to realize it’s just about reaching out and being open. Basically that whole turning off the resting bitch face and making friends thing. And a lot of the interns had interesting experiences and stories that I could learn from.

So, while I still might be Baby, I’m definitely not in a corner. What a nice, little taste of the real world. Now, let’s go back to tailgates and late-night pizza. 


Stuck in my Head: Faded Heart // BORNS
Snap it: Internship HQ

Search Engine Optimization is optimizing/changing/manipulating a website to help it perform better on Search Engines. The goal is to get your site to the top of the page after a search (aka: to rank well in the results). It’s basically a language I’m still trying to learn to speak. Thank god for Google.

And if you’re curious, my site is not very optimized. Don’t blame the blogger, blame the world she blogs in. 

Saying Goodbye to SuperGreens.

If you even relatively know me, you would know that every other word out of my mouth is a praise for CAVA. From their genius social strategy to having hummus so delicious I drool at the thought of it, I have such a huge appreciation for the company. As the semester winds down, I want to reflect on the most valuable things I’ve learned being part of the CAVA marketing team.

  1. Your incredibly energized when you love what you do. Sure I only worked 12 hours a week this semester, but there was never a morning I couldn’t wait to get into the office. No  matter the task, it’s always easier knowing you’re doing it for a brand you believe in with people who believe in you.
  2. There’s no shame in double Crazy Feta. Never have I thought twice about grabbing a snack or going in for another bite of Harissa Nachos. The culture and appreciation for food at CAVA runs deep and it’s taught me to savor each bite, but also each memory. Food is more than being full, it’s a relationship builder and a uniter. I mean, how can you not make a friend over a side of falafel?
  3. Being surrounded by creative people is inspiringI can’t lie, the creativity from CAVA’s marketing team often leaves me speechless or rambling “I love it” like I’ve just found the perfect prom dress. But, seeing so much originality has opened me to the concept that there are no bad ideas and you shouldn’t be scared to speak up. And while some suggestions will inevitably get shot down, it’s about getting back up, tapping into your inspiration networks, and brainstorming again. It’s a challenge not to settle for simple, but I’m excited to start better utilizing my resources (aka Pinterest & Instagram Influencers) and break out of the mold years of school have built. It’s time to get out of the box.
  4. Everything I’ve done with the team has made me more dedicated to finding my professional edge. Each person is so talented and it’s inspiring to watch them all change the fast-casual industry with each new project. Between photo/video,  graphics,  customer service, and social content, it’s impossible to choose one avenue to praise above another. Recently, I’ve been thinking a lot about my professional specialty. Sure, dedication and enthusiasm are noteworthy, but their not the driving forces of my future career. I’m scared to try new things, but I’m excited to explore more aspects of marketing and try to find my niche. Social content feels like it will always have my heart, but there are so many other sides of the field that I haven’t even begun to explore. Hiking boots on, this is going to be one long journey.
  5. Giving and receiving gratitude feels goodAfter every project, big or small, hour long or month long, someone was on the other side of it making sure my efforts were appreciated. And it always felt good to know that my hard work was giving someone else a little lighter of a load. I will never be able to write enough thank you notes for all the amazing projects I’ve done and things I’ve eaten this past semester, but the biggest one I want to express is for making me feel like part of the family. The Hummus to your Harissa. A snacktime soulmate.

So here’s to a bright future, exploring for the summer, and a semester that was so full of CAVA bowls I had to change my order 4 times.

Thank you endlessly.

Stuck in my head: My Body // Young the Giant
Snap it: Chinatown Cava

Calling More Cooks to the Kitchen

Take one look at my Instagram and based on the Cava recipes I’ve posted you would think I’m genius with a knife and some mircogreens. Fact: I don’t even know the difference between a “clove” of garlic and a garlic.

One of my favorite parts of my internship is working with Marissa (think intern friend turned boss/mentor) to film Snapchat and Instagram stories. Besides living out my modeling dreams & getting to pretend to have my own cooking show, it’s been a really great opportunity to experience something so foreign and strange to me. I mean, I know what a whisk is, but why would I ever actually use it? Also, I’ve learned a little about what I like, don’t like, and never want to touch again in the kitchen.

Each recipe is it’s own adventure complete with a learning curve. Our first endevour that made a splash was the Harissa Avocado Grilled Cheese, which set the cooking difficulty bar a little low and the flavor wow factor way high for recipes to come. With each new Toast Tuesday & Hummus Hacks segment I’ve gotten way out of my kitchen comfort zone, which previously consisted of scrambling eggs and baking broccoli. And the best part of all of it is that when things get a little too Top Chef for us, there are so many experienced friends in the office volunteering to help the culinarily-challenged. Leave no hummus lover behind. 

Things I like: Drizzling pomegranate molasses on roasted eggplant & spreading hummus on things.

Things I don’t like: Really hot kitchens with not enough counter space, the smell of turmeric, & how onions actually do make you cry.

Things I never want to touch again: Smoked salmon.

I don’t see myself becoming a star with a stove, but there’s definitely something to be said about becoming more comfortable in the kitchen the more time you spend in it. Besides learning how to sprinkle paprika without it clumping and knead pizza dough, flexibility is a big complement to cooking. Sometimes a little substitution can competely change the chemistry of a meal, and sometimes it adds that little hint of what was missing in the first place. Life can basically be like running out of a spice and having to think and substitute in the moment. Better hope you don’t ruin the dish. 

Catch some of my favorite Cava recipes here. And watch their Instagram stories here to see my hand modeling in action.

Do you ever love your job more than Crazy Feta? Because I definitely do.


Stuck in my head: New Man // Ed Sheeran
Snap it: Loaded Avo Toast (it was so good I cried a little), Cava HQ

 

The Age Dilemma.

While my mom may still write some of my important emails, there’s nothing I love more than getting dressed up & hopping on the metro to intern. Cava is an absolute dream to me- great people, great projects, great (free) food. And I’m so excited to see what next semester of hummus and harissa will bring.

But see, there’s this other phenomenon that has been swirling around my head for a couple months now… the summer intership. Somehow, even as a freshman, the pressure to find the next big resume builder is always lingering in the shadows. Call it a craving for success or a flaw in the whole college thing. You decide.

Now, for me, I think internships are different. I’ve only ever worked in positions I loved (I mean, hello, who doesn’t want to monitor Instagram and Pinterest all day), and because of it I think I have a strange perception of working where everyone loves their job more than their children and finding your ~dream~ job is just a matter of working hard enough to get it. 

Here’s a little context- if you know me, you know I am extremely ambitous. Some would call it overzealous. I call it determined. I’ve known the path I want to follow (career wise) for a while, which has led me to connect other passions to the same purpose. During my not-so-brief Taylor Swift stalker days I researched where her marketing team was HQed so I knew where I would have to move after college (side note: the internet seems to think she’s her own marketing genius, but there’s obviously a team behind her…I mean really… come on, Google). From there my love for food, fashion, and fitness have sparked interests in other companies, most of which don’t necessarily need an 18 year old running around their office in a over-the-knee boots and retro Ray Bans. 

But here’s the thing, I love to work. I find putting fingers to keyboard and putting together work I’m proud of the most satisfying part of a day. Sure getting As is great, I mean I’m the spokesperson for them, I love them more than a perfectly poached egg, I feel as though I could potentially die without them, but completing a task in *the real world* gives me the triumph of feeling one step closer to a DC apartment and an inbox full of emails. & I don’t work to finish, most every project I do I aim to exceed expectations. You want the names of 10 local businesses, I’ll give you 20. You want the project by Friday, I’ll have it on your desk in an hour. I’m not your average college student. I work to kill & I still get 9 hours of sleep a night. 

So, now on to my frustration with the whole work world. With an attitude like mine, it’s still impossible to be a candidate on paper when you’re this young. A couple work experiences, one semester of college, zero business school classes. I mean come on, I might as well just sleep my way through summer.

But hey, that’s never been my style. So I guess I’ll just try twice as hard, work twice as fast, and write twice as many cover letters. Yeah, that’s more like it.

I mean, it’s Summer, who needs the ocean when you can have an office. 


Stuck in my head: Shape of You // Ed Sheeran
Snap it: Adams Morgan

I have some internship leads. I’m working on it. Surprised? You shouldn’t be. 

New Day, New Cava Bowl

If you know me at all, even on some tiny minuscule “hi I’m jordan” level, then you have probably heard me talk about this thing called Cava. Well, I’m not only a dedicated enthusiast of the DC startup but I am also a social media intern at the brands HQ in DC (such a formal little introduction there).

I’m not just bragging about the fact that I work in the marketing department at the best food place in the world, but I wanted to take the chance to share a little about my experience as an intern and how I got started. I realize that most people who read my blog are already in the working world (hi family members & friends) but this ones for all the high schoolers and college freshmen out there #represent. 

I got involved in Cava through my dad, but once the meeting was set it was on me to bring my A game. Being young in a setting of professionals is extremely intimidating, like I probably didn’t speak outside of asking questions for a month, but showing your personal capabilities are so important and, honestly, so fun. 

I remember on first day at Cava I worked with the community manager, Justin, to get familiar with the brand image. Little did he know I had been doing this for months to prep (Advice #1: know your stuff going in- the more credible and informed you are, the more impressed they are). During our meeting I started talking about the contrast in colors the company uses in their brand book to symbolize their dedication to seasonal foods and about my interest in how they locally source their ingredients and he just looked at me, amazed, and said “woah, you’re like actually so smart.” And that moment has driven my entire interning career since. (Granted its only been a year, but cut me a break, it was moving stuff.)

It’s not about what you already know, it’s about what you bring and what you do about it. Advice #2: be vocal. If you want an internship or job or position, chase it. You may not get it because odds are there is someone more prepared and more perfect than you, but at the chance you’re what they want, you would’ve never known if you didn’t try. Be the most passionate. Share your ideas. Put things on the table. Always. 

One thing I never let myself forget is that every experience is a learning one. Yes- Every. Single. Experience. And every task you do takes you closer to something you could potentially be more passionate about. 

“What do you do at Cava?” is one of my favorite questions ever. The answer is not as glamorous as expected- I send packages, fill donation requests, maintain and create outreach spreadsheets for new locations, take inventory, & a bunch of other clerical things. And I would not trade any bit of that for anything. My role there is to make other people’s jobs easier and I start each task with a smile and end with 100% completion and enthusiasm. After about a year now, I’m starting to get into projects more tailored to my interests- visual media and content creation. I’ve started updating the company’s seasonal Pinterest boards and am getting more assignments as we speak. Advice #3: Work your way up & invest in yourself. You can never say thank you enough, because every job you tackle is just another thing that sets you apart and better prepares you for the future. But don’t stop there. This summer I taught myself illustrator (okay, fine, I had a little help) and Google programs (spreadsheets, maps, etc) to improve my skill set and become more versatile in the workplace. Have I even taken a business class yet? Not really. Do I know the power of innovating and marketing myself? Totally- it’s indispensable.   

Lastly, advice #4: find your passion. Cava puts a lot of emphasis on cooking and the power of food, and while I ashamedly say I barely know a pot from a pan, my connection with food is more than just eating (more on this later…). The mentality of the company is something I stand behind whole-platedly and I am so honored to be a part of the team.

Cava is “for those who savor,” and I definitely savor every nanosecond of my time there. I can’t wait to see what’s in store for me this semester- I know it won’t disappoint. 

More to come on my Cava chronicles & the road to real life


Stuck in my head: Past Lives // Borns
Snap it: Cava DuPont

Get this Cava Bowl: Mesclun mix. Half Chicken, Half Falafel. 1 scoop Traditional Hummus & 1 scoop Red Pepper Hummus. Pita crisps.  Tomato & cucumber. Pickled Cabbage. Double quinoa. Feta. Greek Vinegarette. Green Harissa. (& Vanilla Bean Limeaide)